Sheryl Burgstahler

Vita

Sheryl Burgstahler, Ph.D.

Affiliate Professor, College of Education
Founder and Director, DO-IT Center and UW-IT Access Technology Center
Instructor/Advisor, Distance Learning
Current projects include AccessSTEM, AccessDL, AccessComputing, AccessCS10K, AccessEngineering, AccessSTEM CAREERS, RDE Collaborative Dissemination, and the Center for Universal Design in Education

University of Washington (UW)
UW Information Technology, Box 354842
Seattle, WA 98195-4842
206-543-0622
206-221-4171 (FAX)
sherylb@uw.edu
http://staff.washington.edu/sherylb/


Highlights

Degrees. Ph.D. in policy, governance, and administration of higher education, specializing in development and deployment of technology tools and services that are accessible and usable by everyone, including those with disabilities. Master's and bachelor's degree in mathematics and education.

Founder and director of award-winning DO-IT Center at UW. PI/Co-PI of grant-funded projects totaling more than fifty million dollars from dozens of sources over twenty years. Activities for K-12 and postsecondary educators focus on technology-based instruction, inclusive teaching practices, and universal design. Interventions to increase the success of students with disabilities in college and high tech careers include on-site and online mentoring, internships and other work-based learning, academic coaching, and summer programs. The Center supports a comprehensive collection of online resources, including K-12 and postsecondary curriculum and a searchable Knowledge Base.

Teaching. Broad range of on-site, online, and hybrid teaching experiences at precollege, community college, four-year college, and research university levels, including mathematics, computer programming, disability studies, and professional development of K-12 teachers and postsecondary faculty in technology-based instruction and inclusive instructional practices. Instructor of first UW course taught online; instructor in and advisor to the UW certificate program in E-Learning Design. Part-time online instructor on Accessibility and Compliance in Online Education ar Rutgers University.

Educational technology leader. Director of a broad range of campus-wide IT services with areas of responsibility that have included customer support, consulting, student computing spaces, technology training and professional development, software site licensing, computer sales, regional computer fairs, and an access technology showroom and testing area. Has run multiple organizations, managed budgets, collected and analyzed evaluation data, and hired staff and developed teamwork.

Presentations. Delivered over two hundred presentations, including more than thirty five keynote and plenary presentations at national and international conferences and meetings.

Publications. Author/co-author of more than sixty articles in peer-reviewed publications, editor of four peer-reviewed books/journal issues, author/co-author of eight books and six book chapters, author of more than one hundred other publications, and director of projects that have produced more than forty video presentations.


Education

Ph.D., Policy, Governance and Administration of Higher Education, University of Washington (UW), Seattle, WA (Dissertation: Computing Services for Disabled Students in Institutions of Higher Education, 1992)
Masters Degree, Mathematics, University of Washington
Bachelors Degree, Mathematics and Education, University of Washington, Summa Cum Laude, 4.0 GPA


Administrative Experiences

Founder and Director, DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center, UW, 1992-present. In partnership with multiple UW academic units and other institutions, secured more than forty eight million dollars in external funds from the National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Education, State of Washington, and from dozens of private foundations, corporations, and individuals. The award-winning DO-IT Center offers access to assistive technology, online and on-site mentoring, internships and work-based learning activities, summer programs, and other evidence-based interventions to maximize the independence, productivity, and participation of individuals with disabilities in college and careers. DO-IT works with high school students who face significant challenges to pursuing college as a result of disability broadly defined to include conditions that impact sight, hearing, mobility, learning, attention, social interactions, and mental health often combined with other conditions such as poverty, poor academic background, and low expectations on the part of those with whom they interact. DO-IT helps these students pursue promising careers such as those in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Projects for K-12 and postsecondary educators focus on technology-based instruction, inclusive teaching practices, and universal design. DO-IT staff also promote the inclusion of accessibility, usability, and adaptive learning considerations in curriculum (e.g., throughout a course where students design online learning). A sister center at the University of Tokyo is supported by Fujitsu and other funds from Japanese organizations. DO-IT staff also work closely with other programs that serve youth facing challenges in gaining access to and succeeding in college and STEM fields (e.g., National Girls Collaborative; MESA [Mathematics, Education, Science, Achievement], and LSAMP [Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation]) to ensure that students with disabilities are well served in these programs. Job responsibilities include setting goals and priorities, securing funding, hiring talent, supervising and evaluating staff, managing all budgets, managing risk, planning the collection of quantitative and qualitative data, and writing research papers for publication.

Founder and Director, Accessible Technology Services, UW Information Technology (UW-IT, previously, UW Computing & Communications), UW, 1984-present, to ensure access to technology for faculty, students, and staff with disabilities. Services include the DO-IT Center (described above) and the UW Access Technology Center with an assistive technology showroom and consultation and training to campus units about accessible IT. Responsibilities also include developing strategies and securing grant funds to support UW-IT's strategic goals as well as those of the UW.

Assistant Director, UW Information Systems, 1991-2003; Manager, Desktop Computing Services, 1988-91; Manager, Micro Support Group, Computing & Communications, 1984-88, UW. Areas of responsibility (with up to sixty five staff members) include the direction of customer service and support units, student computing spaces, technology training, site licensing, computer sales, regional computer fairs, and an access technology showroom and testing area. Job responsibilities included setting unit goals and priorities consistent with UW and parent organization, planning, hiring talent, supervising and evaluating staff, managing budgets, reporting, and managing change.

Chairman, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, 1980-1984, Saint Martin's College/University, Lacey, WA. Led faculty hiring and supervision, curriculum development, course scheduling, and coordination with other departments. In addition served as director of the Computer In-service, Computers and People with Disabilities, and Summer Session; served as the associate director of the Microcomputer Resource Center.


Teaching Experiences

University of Washington, Seattle, 1985-present (part-time, affiliate professor) On-site: computer- and Internet-based learning for K-12 educators, Disability 101 inquiry seminar. Online: adaptive technology for individuals with disabilities, distance learning design course in the Certificate in E-Learning Design program (and advisor for this program). Non-credit offerings: summer Internet instruction and college/career preparation for high school and college students with disabilities; professional development for postsecondary faculty and administrators nationwide and internationally on teaching with technology, universal design of instruction, inclusive teaching practices, and campus-wide capacity-building.

Saint Martin's College/University, Lacey, WA, 1978-84. Mathematics, math for K-12 and secondary school teachers, computer programming, IT applications in education, student teacher supervision.

Other teaching experience includes postsecondary adjunct positions teaching algebra, trigonometry, calculus, statistics, enrichment activities for teachers, computers in education at schools that include Seattle Pacific University, University of Puget Sound, Fort Steilacoom Community College, University of Maryland, and Los Angeles City College; precollege mathematics (six years total) at Bethel Junior High, Tacoma, and Showalter Junior High, Seattle; and two years in Department of Defense Prep School at Osan Air Base, South Korea.


Peer-Reviewed Books

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2015). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (2nd ed.). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2015). Universal design in higher education: Promising practices. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S., & Cory, R. (Eds.). (2008). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice. Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Author of introductory chapters to major topic sections in Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice Boston: Harvard Education Press: Universal design in higher education; Universal design of instruction; Universal design of physical spaces; Universal design of student services; Universal design of technological environments.


Peer-Reviewed Journal Issues

Burgstahler, S., & Thompson, T. (Guest Eds.). (2014). Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 14(1).

Burgstahler, S. (Guest Ed.). STEM Special Issue. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 24(4).

Burgstahler, S. (Guest Ed.). (2005). Promising practices: Accessible information technology in education, Information Technology and Disability, 11(1).

Burgstahler, S., & Lamb, P. (Guest Eds.). (2003). Journal of Special Education Technology, 18(4).


Selected Publications in Peer-Reviewed Journals and Books

Bellman, S., Burgstahler, S., & Chudler, E. (submitted for publication). Engaging students with disabilities in engineering: Promising practices from an engineering research center.

Burgstahler, S. (2017). Fully including students with disabilities in online courses: Tips for instructors. Currents in Teaching and Learning, 9(2), 8-23.

Bellman, S., Burgstahler, S., & Hinke, P. (2015). Academic coaching outcomes for students with disabilities pursuing science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 28(1), 101-106.

Blaser, B., Steele, K. M., Burgstahler, S. E. (2015). Including universal design in engineering courses to attract diverse students. ASEE Annual Meeting Proceedings, Seattle, WA.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Opening doors or slamming them shut? Online learning practices and students with disabilitiesSocial Inclusion, 3(4).

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Promoters and inhibitors of universal design in higher education. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 287-296). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Universal design in higher education. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 1-28). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Universal design of instruction: From principles to practice. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 31-64). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Universal design of physical spaces: From principles to practice. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 201-213). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Universal design of student services: From principles to practice. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 179-189). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Universal design of technology: From principles to practice. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 231-251). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S., & Moore, E. (2015). Impact of faculty training in UDI on the grades of students with disabilities. In S. Burgstahler (Ed.). Universal design in higher education: Promising practices. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington.

Burgstahler S., & Russo-Gleicher, R. J (2015). Applying universal design to address the needs of postsecondary students on the autism spectrum. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 28(2), 199-212.

Bellman, S., Burgstahler, S., Ladner, R. (2014). Work-based learning experiences help students with disabilities transition to careers: A case study of University of Washington projects. WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment, & Rehabilitation, 48, 399-405.

Burgstahler, S. (2014). Universal design in higher education. In M. L. Vance, N. E. Lipsitz, & K. Parks (Eds.), Beyond the Americans with Disabilities Act: Inclusive policy and practice for higher education. Washington, DC: National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA). 

Thompson, T., & Burgstahler, S. (2014). From the editors of the ITD twentieth anniversary issue. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 14(1).

Thompson, T., Comden, D., Ferguson, S., & Burgstahler, S. (2013). Seeking predictors of web accessibility in U.S. higher education institutions. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 13(1).

Crawford, L., & Burgstahler, S. (2013). Promoting the design of accessible information science learning. In S. Burgstahler (Ed.), Universal design in higher education: Promising practices. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S., & Moore, E. (2013). Development of a UD checklist for postsecondary student services. In S. Burgstahler (Ed.), Universal design in higher education: Promising practices. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington.

Blaser, B., Burgstahler, S., & Braitmayer, K. (2012). AccessDesign: A two-day workshop for students with disabilities exploring design careers. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 25(2), 197-201.

Burgstahler, S. (2011). Universal design: Implications for computing education. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 11(3).

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.) (2011). Special Issue: STEM Education. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 24(4), 265-267.

Burgstahler, S., Anderson, A., & Litzkow, M. (2011). Accessible technology for online and face-to-face teaching and learning. In T. Cox & K. King (Eds.), The professor's guide to taming technology (pp. 201-218). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Burgstahler, S., & Comden, D. (2011). Computer and cell phone access for individuals with mobility impairments: State of the art. NeuroRehabilitation, 28(3), 183-197.

Burgstahler, S., & Thompson, T. (2011). Fully including students, teachers, and administrators with disabilities in telementoring. In D. A. Scigliano (Ed.), Telementoring in the K-12 classroom (pp. 89-115). Hershey, NY: Information Science Reference.

Leake, D., Burgstahler, S., & Izzo, M. (2011). Promoting transition success for culturally and linguistically diverse students with disabilities: The value of mentoring. Creative Education, 2(2), 121-129.

Stumbo, N. J., Martin, J. K., Nordstrom, D., Rolfe, T., Burgstahler, S., Whitney, J . . . Misquez, E. (2011/2010). Evidence-based practices in mentoring students with disabilities: Four case studies. Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities, 14(1), 33-54.

Thompson, T., Burgstahler, S., & Moore, E. (2010). Web accessibility: A longitudinal study of college and university home pages in the northwestern United States. Disability & Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 5(2), 108-114.

Burgstahler, S., & Bellman, S. (2009). Differences in perceived benefits of internships for subgroups of students with disabilities. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 31(3), 155-165.

Burgstahler, S., & Chang, C. (2009). Promising interventions for promoting STEM fields to students who have disabilities. Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 5(2), 29-47.

Burgstahler, S., & Moore, E. (2009). Making student services welcoming and accessible through accommodations and universal design. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 21(3), 151-174.

Burgstahler, S. (2008). Universal design in higher education. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 3-20). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2008). Universal design of instruction: From principles to practice. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 23-44). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2008). Universal design of physical spaces: From principles to practice. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 187-197). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2008). Universal design of student services: From principles to practice. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 167-175). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2008). Universal design of technological environments: From principles to practice. In Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (pp. 213-224). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. & Cory, R. (2008). Moving in from the margins: From accommodation to universal design. In S. Gabel & S. Danforth (Eds.), Handbook of Disability Studies and Education (pp. 561-581). New York: Peter Lang.

Burgstahler, S., Slatin, J., Anderson, A., & Lewis, K. (2008). Accessible IT: Lessons learned from three universities. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 12(1).

Isakson, C., & Burgstahler, S. (2008). College preparation and participation: Reports from individuals who have speech and mobility disabilities. The Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 4(3), 18-32.

Burgstahler, S. (2007). Accessibility training for distance learning personnel. Access Technologists Higher Education Network (ATHEN) E-Journal, 2.

Burgstahler, S. (2007). Lessons learned in The Faculty Room. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 18(3), 103-128.

Burgstahler, S., & Chang, C. (2007). Gender differences in perceived value of components of a program to promote academic and career success for students with disabilities. Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities, 12(1).

Cory, R. C., & Burgstahler, S. (2007). Creating virtual community: Mentoring kids with disabilities on the Internet. Journal of School Public Relations, 28(3), 283-296.

Thompson, T., Burgstahler, S., & Moore, E. (2007). Accessibility of higher education web pages in the Northwestern United States: Current status and response to third party outreach. In proceedings of the First International Conference on Technology-based Learning With Disability (pp. 127-136). Dayton, Ohio, Wright State University.

Thompson, T., Burgstahler, S., Moore, E., Gunderson, J., & Hoyt, N. (2007). International research on web accessibility for persons with disabilities. In M. Khosrow-Pour (Ed), Managing worldwide operations and communications with information technology. Hershey, PA: Information Resources Management Association.

Burgstahler, S. (2006). The development of accessibility indicators for distance learning programs. Research in Learning Technology, 14(1), 79-102.

Burgstahler, S., & Doe, T. (2006). Improving postsecondary outcomes for students with disabilities: Designing professional development for faculty. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 18(2), 135-147.

Degrift, T., Poginy, A., Ladner, R., & Burgstaher, S. (2006). The game of life workshop - Reaching out to high school students with disabilities. American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Conference. Recipient of Best Paper Award.

Isaakson, C., & Burgstahler, S. (2006). AAC, employment, and independent living: A success story. Assistive Technology Outcomes and Benefits, 3(1), 67-78.

Leake, D., Burgstahler, S., Rickerson, N., Applequist, K., Izzo, M., Arai, M., & Picklesimer, T. (2006). Literature synthesis of key issues in supporting culturally and linguistically diverse students with disabilities to succeed in postsecondary education. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 18(2), 149-165.

Vogel, S., Leyser, Y., Burgstahler, S., Sliger, S., & Zecker, S. (2006). Faculty knowledge and practices regarding students with disabilities in three contrasting institutions of higher education. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 18(2), 109-123.

Burgstahler, S. (2005). Accommodating students with disabilities: Professional development needs of faculty. In To improve the academy: Resources for faculty, instructional, and organizational development (pp. 179-195). Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing Company.

Burgstahler, S. (2005). Faculty development and students with disabilities: Accommodations and universal design. In M. Ouellett (Ed.). Teaching inclusively: Resources for course, department, and institutional change in higher education (pp. 393-404). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2005). Preparing faculty to make their courses accessible to all students. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 16(2), 69-86.

Burgstahler, S. (2005). The role of technology in preparing for college and careers. In E. E. Getzel & P. W. Wehwan (Eds.), Going to college: Expanding opportunities with disabilities (pp. 179-98). Baltimore, MD: Paul Brookes Publishing Company.

Burgstahler, S. (2005). Web accessibility: Guidelines for busy administrators. In P. Coate (Ed.), Handbook of business strategy (pp. 313-318). Cambridge, MA: Emerald Publishing Limited.

Burgstahler, S. (2005). Web-based distance learning and the second digital divide. In M. Khosrow-Pour (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Information Science and Information Technology (pp. 3079-84). Hershey, PA: Idea Group Inc.

Burgstahler, S., & Bellman, S. (2005). Perceived benefits of work-based learning: Differences between high school and postsecondary students with disabilities. The Asia-Pacific Journal of Inclusive Education, 2(1), 1-20.

Burgstahler, S., Corrigan, B., & McCarter, J. (2005). Steps toward making distance learning accessible to students and instructors with disabilities. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 11(1).

Burgstahler, S., & Doyle, A. (2005). Gender differences in computer-mediated communication among adolescents with disabilities: A case study. Disability Studies Quarterly, 25(2).

Burgstahler, S., Corrigan, B., & McCarter, J. (2004). Making distance learning courses accessible to students and instructors with disabilities: A case study. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(2004), 233-246.

Burgstahler, S., & Doe, T. (2004). Disability-related simulations: If, when, and how to use them. Review of Disability Studies: An International Journal, 1(2), 4-17.

Burgstahler, S., Jirikowic, T., Kolko, B., & Eliot, M. (2004). Software accessibility, usability testing and individuals with disabilities. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 10(2).

Kim-Rupnow, W. S., & Burgstahler, S. (2004). Perceptions of students with disabilities regarding the value of technology-based support activities on postsecondary education and employment. Journal of Special Education Technology, 19(2), 43-56.

Burgstahler, S. (2004). Celebrate EASI? That's Easy!. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 10(1).

Burgstahler, S. (2003). The role of technology in preparing youth with disabilities for postsecondary education and employment. Journal of Special Education Technology, 18(4). Earlier version peer reviewed through the National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports.

Burgstahler, S. (2003). Web-based distance learning and the second digital divide. In M. Hricko (Ed.), Design and implementation of Web-enabled teaching tools. Hershey, PA: IRM Press.

Jirikowic, T., Rickerson, N., & Burgstahler, S. (2003). Life after high school: Preparing students with disabilities for successful transitions. OT Practice, 8(19), 20-24.

Thompson, T., Burgstahler, S., & Comden, D. (2003). Research on web accessibility in higher education. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 9(2).

Burgstahler, S. (2002). Accommodating students with disabilities: Professional development needs of faculty. To Improve the Academy: Resources for Faculty, Instructional, and Organizational Development, 21, 181-183.

Burgstahler, S. (2002). Distance learning: The library's role in ensuring access to everyone. Library Hi Tech, 20(4), 420-432.

Burgstahler, S., & Jirikowic, T. (2002). Supporting students with disabilities: What every teaching assistant should know. Journal of Graduate Teaching Assistant Development, 9(1), 23-30.

Burgstahler, S. (2001). A collaborative model promotes career success for students with disabilities: How DO-IT does it. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation, 16(3-4), 209-216.

Burgstahler, S., Crawford, L., & Acosta, J. (2001). Transition from two-year to four-year institutions for students with disabilities. Disability Studies Quarterly, 21(1), 25-38.

Burgstahler, S., & Cronheim, D. (2001). Supporting peer-peer and mentor-protege relationships on the internet. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 34(1), 59-74.

Burgstahler, S. (2000). Access to Internet-based instruction for people with disabilities. In L. A. Petrides (Ed.), Case studies on information technology in higher education (pp. 76-88). Hershey, PA: IRM Press.

Burgstahler, S. (2000). Web-based instruction and people with disabilities. In R. Cole (Ed.), Issues in Web-based pedagogy: A critical primer. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.

Burgstahler, S. (1997). Peer support: What role can the Internet play?. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 4(4).

Burgstahler, S., & Comden, D. (1997). World wide access: Focus on libraries. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 4(1).

Burgstahler, S., & Olswang, S. (1996). Computing and networking services for students with disabilities: How do community colleges measure up? Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 20(4), 363-376.

Burgstahler, S. (1995). Distance learning and the information highway. The Journal of Rehabilitation Administration, 19(4), 271-276.

Burgstahler, S. (1995). Faculty facilitate research for students with disabilities. Council on Undergraduate Research Quarterly, 8-11.

Burgstahler, S., & Orvis, M. (1995). Transition to college: Preliminary findings of four case studies. In Accessing the issues: Current research in disability studies (pp. 297-301). Lewiston, ME: Society for Disability Studies.

Burgstahler, S. (1994). Increasing the representation of people with disabilities in science, engineering, and mathematics. Information Technology and Disabilities Journal, 1(4).


Books and Book Chapters

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2015). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice (2nd ed.). Boston: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2015). Universal design in higher education: Promising practices. Seattle: DO-IT, University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S. (2014). Universal design in higher education. In Vance, M. (Ed.) Beyond the Americans With Disabilities Act: Inclusive policy and practice for higher education. Washington, D.C.: NASPA Students Affairs Administrators in Higher Education.

Burgstahler, S., Stefanich, G., & Stodden, R. (2014). College students with disabilities in STEM: Expanding opportunities by enhancing communication of evidence-based information with stakeholders. B. S. Duerstock & C. A. Shingledecker, Eds. (pp. 48-60). From college to careers: Fostering inclusion of persons with disabilities in STEM. Washington, D.C.: American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Burgstahler, S. (2009). Universal design of distance and online learning. In P. L. Rogers, G. A. Berg, J. V. Boettecher, C. Howard, L. Justice, & K. D. Schenk (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Distance Learning (2nd ed., pp. 2195-2201). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Burgstahler, S. (2007). Applications of universal design in higher education. In P. B. Richards (Ed.), Global Issues in Higher Education (pp. 1-4). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Burgstahler, S., Jirikowic, T., & Lopez, S. (2007). Creating a transition program for teens: How DO-IT does it and how you can do it too. Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S., (2006). Creating an e-mentoring community: How DO-IT does it and how you can do it too. Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S., & Utterback, L. (1999). New kids on the net: Internet activities for elementary language arts. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, Simon and Schuster.

Burgstahler, S. (author), & Burgstahler, T. (illustrator). (1998). New kids on the net: Internet activities for young learners. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, Simon and Schuster.

Burgstahler, S., & Murakami, C. (1998). New kids on the net: Internet activities for secondary mathematics. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, Simon and Schuster.

Burgstahler, S., & Sahl, K. (1998). New kids on the net: Internet activities for secondary science. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, Simon and Schuster.

Burgstahler, S. (1997). New kids on the net: A tutorial for teachers, parents, and students. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, Simon and Schuster.

Burgstahler, S. (1997). New kids on the net: Network sampler. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, Simon and Schuster.

Burgstahler, S. (1997). Students with disabilities and the online classroom. In Z. L. Berge & M. P. Collins (Eds.), Wired together: The online classroom in k-12, Volume I: Perspectives and instructional design. (pp. 197-208). Cresskill, NJ: M. Hampton Press, Inc.

Burgstahler, S. (1996). Equal access to computer networks for students and scholars with disabilities. In T. M. Harrison & T. D. Stephen (Eds.), Computer networking and scholarly communication in the twenty-first-century university (pp. 233-241). Albany: State University of New York Press.

Burgstahler, S. (1994). Computer technologies for students with disabilities in post-secondary institutions: Results of an exploratory study. In E. Makas & L. Schlesinger (Eds.), Insights and Outlooks: Current Trends in Disability Studies (pp. 239-245). Lewiston, ME: Society for Disability Studies.

Burgstahler, S. (1992). Computers and teaching chemistry. In F. Kucera, Teaching Chemistry to Students with Disabilities (pp. 14-17). Washington, DC: American Chemical Society.


Selected Curriculum/Training/Resource Materials

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2009). Building the team: Faculty, staff, and students working together - Presentation and resource materials. Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2009). Making math, science and technology instruction accessible to students with disabilities. Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2007). Building capacity for a welcoming and accessible postsecondary institution. Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S. (Ed.). (2006). Students with disabilities and campus services: Building the team - Presentation and resource materials. Seattle: University of Washington.

Directed development of comprehensive web resources, including:

AccessCollege collection of websites for multiple stakeholder groups focused on college success for students with disabilities: The Faculty Room, The Student Services, The Conference Room, The Employment Office, The Veterans' Center, The Student Lounge, The Board Room.

The Center for Universal Design in Education collection of publications and links to useful resources regarding the application of universal design to instruction, services, physical spaces, and technology in educational settings.

Collaborative Dissemination collection of projects and resources developed by National Science Foundation projects focused on access to STEM for individuals with disabilities.

Directed development of over 40 training videos.


Selected Other Publications

Blaser, B., Ladner, R., Burgstahler, S. (submitted for publication). Lessons learned: Engaging students with disabilities on a national scale.

Burgstahler, S & Vinten-Johansen, C. (2017, September 11). Seven steps toward IT accessibility compliance. Educause Review.

Burgstahler, S. (2017, January 30). ADA Compliance for Online Course Design. Educause Review.

Burgstahler, S. (2015, May 30). 20 tips for teaching an accessible online course. NEWSMAG.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Preparing for accessible e-learning. Presented at International Symposium on Impacts of ICT on Supporting Students with Disabilities in Higher Education, Makuhari Messe, Japan.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). 20 tips for teaching an accessible online course. Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S. (2015). Preparing for accessible e-learning. Paper presented at OUJ International Symposium: Impacts of ICT on Supporting Students with Disabilities in Higher Education.

Ladner, R., & Burgstahler, S. (2015). Increasing the participation of individuals with disabilities in computing, Communications of the ACM. 58(12). 33–36.

Burgstahler, S. (2014). Universal design—How do students with learning disabilities benefit? LDA Today.

Burgstahler, S., & Bellman, S. (June/July 2014). The DO-IT success panel: Words of wisdom from students with disabilities in a transition-to-college program.Closing the Gap Solutions, 19-22.

Burgstahler, S., Stefanich, G., & Stodden R. (2014). College students with disabilities in STEM: Expanding opportunities by enhancing communication of evidence-based information with stakeholders. In B. S. Duerstock & C. A. Shingledecker, (Eds.), From College to Careers: Fostering Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in STEM (pp. 48-60). Washington, DC: Science/AAAS.

Burgstahler, S. (2013). Universal design—How do students with learning disabilities benefit? LDA Today.

Burgstahler, S. (2012). Promoting the success of students with learning disabilities through accommodations and transition support, technology access, and universal design. Sendai, Japan: Japan Academy of Learning Disabilities (JALD).

Burgstahler, S., & Crawford, L. (2012). Engaging students with disabilities in accessibility reviews. Dimensions, the magazine for the Association of Science-Technology Centers.

Burgstahler, S., Ladner, R., & Bellman, S. (2012). Strategies for increasing the participation in computing of students with disabilities. ACM Inroads, 3(4), 42-48.

Burgstahler, S. (2007). Universal design of instruction: An approach for making your course accessible to all students. Academe.

Burgstahler, S. (2006). Creating an e-mentoring community. National Center on Secondary Education and Transition Information Brief, 5(4).

Whelley, T. A., Radtke, R., Burgstahler, S., & Christ, T. W. (2003). Mentors, advisors, role models and peer supporters: Career development relationships and individuals with disabilities. American Rehabilitation, 27(1), 42-49.

Rowland, C., Burgstahler, S., Smith, J., & Coombs, N. (2004). Issues in accessing distance education technologies for individuals with disabilities. White paper for National Summit on Disability and Distance Education, Washington, DC, May 11-12.

Burgstahler, S. (2002). Universal design of distance learning. Well Connected Educator, February issue, available TechLEARNING.com.

Burgstahler, S., & Comden, D. (1998). Creating a level playing field for the world wide web. Ability, 98(2), 56-59.

More than 70 other publications.


Selected Invited Keynote Addresses and Plenary Sessions

National/International

Diversity and AccessERC, NSF Engineering Research Centers Biennial meeting, Alexandrea, VA, November 2017

Inclusive postsecondary education, Inclusive Education in Higher Education Conference, Nanyang Technology University, Singapore, October 2017

Adaptation and replication of DO-IT practices, Inclusive Education in Higher Education Conference, Nanyang Technology University, Singapore, October 2017

Stakeholder roles in US. Ed-ICT Symposium: Disabled Students, ICT, Post-Compulsory Education and Employment: In Search of New Solutions, Montreal, Canada, May 2017.

Inclusive excellence: Let's talk about "inclusive" plenary session. University of Coloado, Boulder, November 2016

UD practices that minimize the need for accommodations for students with disabilities in the classroom. The 22nd International Seminar, Asan, South Korea, October, 2015.

Inclusive practices that lead to an inclusive society, First Annual International Conference on Special Education, Bangkok, Thailand, July, 2015.

Preparing for accessible e-learning, International Symposium on Impacts of ICT on Supporting Students with Disabilities in Higher Education, Tokyo, Japan, February 2015.

AccessComputing outcomes, Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) conference, Baltimore, MD, January 2015.

Applications of universal design, Pathways 12 Conference, Perth, Western Australia, December 2014.

Adaptive technology tools for special needs children and adults. Broadspire national webinar, September 2014.

Universal design - how do students with learning disabilities benefit?, Learning Disabilities Association Conference, Anaheim, CA, February, 2014.

Students with disabilities, university education, and success: How do we get there?, Claro Learning Conference, United Kingdom, June 2013.

Universal design in higher education, University of Fraser Valley, Abbotsford, BC, Canada, April 2013.

Universal design in education and Assistive technology and accessible technology design, Capacity-Building Institute at Landmark College, Putney, VT, April 2013.

Inclusive teaching and learning practices: Applications of universal design. Podcast sponsored by EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative, April 2013.

Universal design in education: Overview and applications, podcast sponsored by American Clearinghouse on Educational Facilities (ACEF), February 2013.

How technology can help people with diverse abilities fully participate in society. Fujitsu-sponsored presentation, Tokyo, Japan, October 2012.

Promoting the success of students with learning disabilities through accommodations, universal design, transition support, and technology. Japan Association for Learning Disabilities, Sendai, Japan, October 2012.

Models of disability and universal design. Creating Museum Media for Everyone conference hosted by Museum of Science-Boston, March 2012.

Practices in the U.S. for preparing students with disabilities for college and career. International workshop on special needs education, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, September 2011.

Book review webinar: Universal design in higher education?From principles to practice. Equal Access To Software and Information (EASI) webinar, June 2011.

Promising practices for increasing the college and career success of students with disabilities. Seoul National University, South Korea, March 2011.

Persons with disabilities in the professoriate. Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate National Conference, Chicago, IL, March 2009.

Inclusion of individuals with disabilities: Accommodations and universal design. Workshop of Excellence Empowered by a Diverse Academic Workforce: Chemists, Chemical Engineers, and Materials Scientists with Disabilities, Washington D.C., February 2009.

Enhancing STEM education for students with disabilities. National Science Foundation meeting. Washington D.C., October 2008.

What's next in higher education and beyond? AccessEd Conference, University of Wisconsin-Madison, September 2008.

Universal design in higher education and beyond. AccessEd conference. Milwaukee, WI, September 2008.

Academics, careers, independent living, leadership: What you can do to prepare for success. Teaching All Students, Reaching All Learners, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI, March 2007.

Access to assistive technology and accessible technology in the U.S. First nationwide assistive technology conference for educational leaders in India, November 2006.

College, careers, independent living, and leadership: What you can do now to prepare for success. Hiroshima University, Japan; University of Tokyo, Japan, August 2006.

Accommodations, universal design, e-mentoring, self-determination. In research to practice presentations to education leaders from South Korea, Seattle, July 2006.

Professional development for postsecondary faculty: From principles to practice. National Capacity-Building Institute, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, March 2006.

AT, IT, UD, ... How can you find your way through the jargon jungle and leave no child behind? Technology Innovation in Education Conference, Sioux Falls, SD, April 2004.

The role of technology in improving career outcomes for individuals with disabilities. Technology Capacity Building Institute, National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports and the National Center for Secondary Education and Transition, Seattle, April 2003.

The role of technology in improving career outcomes for individuals with disabilities. Capacity Building Institute, National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports and the National Center for Secondary Education and Transition, Waikiki, HI, February 2003.

Accessible design of distance learning courses. National teleconference, Dallas, TX, October 2002.

The role of technology in improving postsecondary academic and career outcomes for students with disabilities. Policy summit hosted by the National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Educational Supports and the National Center for Secondary Education and Transition, Washington, DC, July 2002.

Assistive technology and universal design. National teleconference, University of Vermont, March 2002.

Accommodating students with disabilities and providing access to assistive technology on postsecondary campuses in the United States, Kyoto, Japan, November 2001.

Providing professional development to faculty regarding the inclusion of students with disabilities. Connecticut Association for Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD), Hartford, CT, October 2001.

The role of parents in the transition of students with disabilities to postsecondary education. Teleconference sponsored by National Transition Alliance, August 2001.

Keynote address on access to technology for people with disabilities. International Positive Feedback conference, University of Sussex, United Kingdom, April 1998.

Local/Regional

Making on-Grounds & online learning inclusive of all students through universal design & related practices. University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, May, 2016.

Accessibility and compliance in online education. Online course, Rutgers University, New Jersey, April-May, 2016.

Building inclusive learning environments, University of Colorado-Boulder, April, 2016.

Making online courses accessible to students with disabilities. Online course offered at University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA, February, 2016.

Making courses, technology, student services, physical spaces accessible to students with disabilities. Workshop at University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA, October, 2015.

Universal design in postsecondary education. Iowa State University, Iowa, October, 2015.

Accessibility and compliance in online education. Online course, Rutgers University, New Jersey, July, 2015.

Implications of universal design for people with disabilities in education, employment, and healthcare. Presentation in academic course for course on Disability, Representation in Society. UW Bothell, WA, March, 2015.

IT accessibility and the UW. University of Washington, Seattle, WA, February, 2015.

Overview of IT accessibility issues & our UW journey, IT Accessibility in Higher Education: A Capacity-Building Institute for Washington State, Seattle, WA, February, 2015.

Accessibility and compliance in online education. Online course, Rutgers University, New Jersey, July, 2014.

Universal design in higher education keynote address and facilitation of panels and discussion of students with disabilities and faculty, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, March, 2014.

Accommodations, universal design, interventions, and resources for increasing the success of students with learning differences in college, Expanding Horizons Conference, Woodlands, TX, November, 2013.

Universal design in higher education, Ohio University, May 2012.

Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice. San Diego regional faculty conference, February 2012.

Engage all students through applications of universal design. Lower Columbia College, WA, February 2012.

Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice. Texas A&M statewide institute, Galveston, TX, June 2011.

Effectively teaching all college students, including those with hidden disabilities. College of New Jersey, January 2010.

Making science labs accessible to students with disabilities. Eastern Alliance in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Conference, University of Southern Maine, Wakefield, MA, November 2006.

Increasing the representation of people with disabilities in STEM careers: From research to practice. Eastern Alliance in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Conference, Portland, ME, October 2005.

Making career services accessible to all students. Kansas and Missouri conference for directors of career services, Kansas City, MO, October 2005.

The balancing act: Universal design and accommodations; E-Learning: Universal design, universal access. Universal Design for Learning Conference, LA Board of Regents, Baton Rouge, LA (plus telecast throughout the state), April 2004.

Assistive technology, universal design, and the digital divide. SE DBTAC (Disability Business and Technical Assistance Center) Educational Leadership Initiative partner meeting, Atlanta, GA, October 2003.

Accommodations vs. universal design. Joliet Junior College, Joliet, IL, August 2003.

Designing distance learning courses that are accessible to everyone. California Association for Higher Education and Disability, San Francisco, CA, October 2002.

Access to technology: Where have we been? Where are we now? Where are we going? Keynote address at Universal Access statewide conference hosted by Temple University, Harrisburg, PA, 2002.

Keynote address on learning technologies. Illuminating Learning and Technology, Columbus, OH, October 2001.

Bridging the digital divide. SIGUCCS (Special interest group for computer services providers in postsecondary institutions), Portland, OR, October 2001.


Other Presentations

More than 100 other presentations have been delivered.


Selected Individual and Program Honors and Awards

National

Strache Leadership Award for those who work with students as educator and mentor, while remaining a leader in the fields of disability and assistive technology through publications, presentations and research, presented at the Keynote Address of the 2012 CSUN Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference.

Professional Recognition Award for outstanding achievement and contributions to the field of higher education and disability. AHEAD is the premiere professional association for disability services personnel, Association of Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD), 2011.

Greenberg Award for Innovation for demonstrated innovation in the preparation of college students with disabilities and the recruitment of these students for employment, presented at annual conference for Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities (COSD), 2007.

Catalyst Award to honor people who inspire action and foster the achievements of others, while taking none of the credit for themselves and their contributions to the field of technology and disability. Trace Research and Development Center, 2006.

Outstanding Program Award, AHEAD, for promoting the success of students with disabilities, presented to DO-IT Center at national conference, 2001.

The Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring presented to DO-IT Center at the White House, 1997.

National Information Infrastructure Award in Education for exemplary work to support education, presented to DO-IT Center in Washington, D.C., 1995.

Washington State

Golden Apple Award in Education for exemplary education program, presented to DO-IT Center, 1999.

Washington Association of Postsecondary Education and Disability (WAPED) Service Award, presented to DO-IT Center, 1995.

Local

Achievement, Collaboration, and Excellence (ACE) award to AccessComputing project team from UW-IT, UW, 2012; Certificate of Recognition, UW College of Engineering Innovator, 2011; Nominee, Jefferson Award for community service, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 1998; King County Vocational/Special Education Community Partnership Award, DO-IT, 1995.

Service

Editorial Board, Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability (JPED), Peer-reviewer on papers submitted to journals that include JPED, Journal of Excellence in College Teaching, Information Technology and Disability, Journal of Special Education Technology. Academic position promotion reviewer. Guest presenter in academic classes at UW. Volunteer, Seattle Children's Hospital and Ronald McDonald House.


Return to Sheryl Burgstahler's home page
Sheryl Burgstahler
sherylb@uw.edu
Last modified: November 9 2017